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WRAHP’s organizational goal is to achieve a just and equitable society where women and young girls enjoy sound health, equal development and maximum self actualization.

WRAHP works to attain this through six core objectives, two of which have goals that address women’s rights. These are:


In 2008, a small grant from the Sexuality, Society and Gender Program of the University of Uppsala in Sweden was recived to undertake a research on Senegalese women’s sexuality which findings would be published as a book.The research was completed an all articles drafted, but the money for printing and disseminating the book was lacking.  This grant made the publication possible.  

Project:  Publication of a Resource Book on Sexuality in Senegal


Womankind works to address issues arising from taboos around sexuality; women's limited ownership of their bodies; customary practices that constitute major human rights violations; the discriminatory nature of laws related to sexuality which lead to severe human rights violations; the discrepancies between law and practice; the conceptualization of women's bodies and sexuality as belonging to men, their families and society, and insufficient sexual and reproductive health services available to Women to claim their sexual rights in Karu and Keffi in Nasarawa State, north central Nigeria.


Safe haven’s organisational  goal is to challenge violence anywhere we see it, with a focus on protecting women and girls.  The idea for the FGM/C project originated as a result of the considerable success of high level of community support and trust through other projects executed in the community. Our organization has as one of its cardinal objectives a desire to end violence against women.  We therefore see the subjection of young girls to the painful exercise of FGM without seeking their consent as violence against them which we have to fight against. 


REFEPA’s goal in this project was to give voice to women to assert their rights to property and inheritance in the context of State laws, Muslim laws and customary laws. The project undertook action research in two sites – Hamdallahi and Kollo Zarma – and used the following strategies to achieve the above goal:


Zamfara is the first State to implement full shariah Legal System in Nigeria, thereby occupying a strategically important position in the Political Systems of the predominantly Muslim North of Nigeria . Although Islam guarantees rights of women,  in practice, women are deprived of their sexuality rights and in some cases subjected to unjust disadvantages in the name of  ‘shariah’.


CEADER’s organizational goal is to increase women’s capacity to overcome poverty and increase their participation in development activity.   CEADER works to promote and protect economic and social rights. The right to health, including reproductive and sexual rights and other components of health care are categorized under economic and social rights. Furthermore, CEADER’s projects in slum communities seek to address sexuality and reproductive issues amongst slum.  


This project, implemented by Mutawinat Benevolent Company(Mutawinat), sought to secure inheritance rights of Muslim women, which are generally denied in customary practice, even though their rights are recognised in Muslim laws. The project addressed the lack of public awareness of such rights and the stigmatisation of women who demand their inheritance. 

Mutawinat adopted a strategy that included the following aspects:


This project was implemented by RADI to address discrimination suffered by Senagalese women in relation to inheritance and land ownership. Although women’s equal right to inheritance is recognized in the Constitution, certain interpretations of Muslim laws and customary laws continue to discriminate against women in Senegal.  The project was undertaken in the Senegal River Valley, using three strategies: (a) social mobilization, (b) capacity building, and (c) advocacy with decision-makers.


It is estimated that some 140 million women, girls and babies throughout the world have been genitally mutilated. Another three million girls are at risk of such mutilation each year. Female genital mutilation is primarily practised in 28 African countries, the incidence varying markedly within various regions and countries according to ethnic affiliation. National rates of prevalence vary from 1 to 98 percent. The practice is also transported to Europe, America and else-where as a result of migration.